This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Chromatic Scale. Only three fingers are used to play the scale. Starting on the note, C, going up the scale, the fingering for the right hand is 1313 123 1313 12. Starting on the note C, going down the scale, the fingering for the right hand is simply reversed. 1st finger plays G, 3rd plays G#, 1st finger plays A and 3rd plays A#. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. What fingers go on what keys? As a result, in 12-tone equal temperament (the most common temperament in Western music), the chromatic scale covers all 12 of the available pitches. These cookies do not store any personal information. Piano Lesson - Ascending Chromatic (12-tone) Scale - YouTube The piano diagram below shows the note positions and note names. All you do is move from one key to the next. The Chromatic Scale is the same whether ascending or descending and regardless of key signature. When it comes to naming the notes shown in the last step, the decision to be made is whether to use sharp or flat note names, both ascending or descending. The general practice is to use sharps when ascending and flats when descending, which is a great idea. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. My Best Recommendation: Click here for the BEST piano/keyboard course I’ve seen on the Internet. Find guitar scales using graphic interface. Go here for my favorite online course for learning how to play piano. Its spelling is, however, often dependent upon major or minor key signatures and whether the scale is ascending or descending. Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. Out of these, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. Scale - Chromatic 1,b2,2,b3,3,4,b5,5,#5,6,b7,7 FULL-th pattern Root note - C Guitar Tuning: 3rd finger plays Bb, 1st finger plays A, 3rd finger plays Ab and 1st plays G. 3rd finger plays Gb, 1st plays F and 2nd plays E. 3rd plays Eb, 1st plays D, 3rd plays Db and 1st plays C. As is the case with the right hand, for the left hand, all the black keys are played with the middle (third) finger. The chromatic scale, ascending The chromatic scale, descending The chromatic scale, ascending The chromatic scale, descending. We know that this major scale does not have any sharp or flat notes, so the second explanation above applies - sharps when ascending, flats when descending. This scale consists of 12 notes, each a half step (semitone) apart. All the black keys are played with the middle (third) finger. In the key of C, you start on C and end on C. In the key of G, you start on G and end on G. And so on. This can be referred to as a chromatic movement. For this example - the chromatic scale in the key of C, let's assume that we are working with the major scale of the same key - C major scale, and want to identify some chromatic scale notes outside that key. Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. © 2009-2020 Piano-Keyboard-Guide.com. Often sharps are used when ascending in the chromatic scale, and flats are used when descending. The chromatic scale is arguably one of the easiest scales to understand, particularly on piano. 1st finger plays C and 2nd finger plays B. But you should reverse that as well: ascending flats and descending sharps. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. This scale has no set spelling agreed upon by all. A chromatic scale (ascending) This step gives note names to the piano keys identified in the previous step. They are the thumb (1st finger), index finger (2nd finger) and middle finger (third finger). This step gives descending note names to the piano keys identified in step 2. When it comes to naming the notes shown in the last step, the decision to be made is whether to use sharp or flat note names, both ascending or descending. This is because you simply go from one key to the other without skipping any. This website uses cookies to improve your experience. The Chromatic Scale consists of twelve notes that each are one semi-step apart (it can be compared with the contrary diatonic scale), and is also called the Half-tone Scale.As you can see on the picture below, all notes in the octave are included. Although there seem to be no generally agreed rules on how to handle this, one common music theory convention is to use sharps when ascending the scale ie. But opting out of some of these cookies may affect your browsing experience. Descending, the fingering is 21 3131 321 3131. The general practice is to use sharps when ascending and flats when descending, which is a great idea. The Solution below shows the C chromatic scale notes on the piano keyboard. To go down the scale, you simply reverse the order of numbers. Most classical western music (the music of Bach and Beethoven, for … How about the fingering for this scale? Notes in the C-sharp chromatic scale. Every white or black key could have a flat(b) or sharp(#) accidental name, depending on how that note is used. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. Chromatic scales are not very useful as groundworks for a composition, instead they can be integrated as parts of songs. Amazon has a wide range of affordable keyboards and accessories. Let’s find out. For instance, let’s say you start on the note C. The C chromatic scale would consist of the notes, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#,A, A# and B. When descending, if a white key follows another, the first one is played with the 2nd finger, while the one to its immediate left is played with 1st finger. © 2020 Copyright Veler Ltd, All Rights Reserved. Here’s the chromatic scale, ascending and descending. C Chromatic Guitar Scale. major scale, or any minor scale), then the key signature will be the guide as to whether to use sharps or flats for the chromatic scale. When it comes to naming the notes shown in the last step, the decision to be made is whether to use sharp or flat note names, both ascending or descending. In terms of the note names that can be used (or enharmonics), these are only examples and can vary. Starting on the note D, to form this scale, the 12 notes of the scale are D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C and C#. Find one below. 1st finger plays E, 2nd plays F and 3rd plays F#. Starting on C, the 1st finger (thumb) plays C, 3rd finger plays C#, 1st finger plays D and 3rd finger plays D#. Put simply, a chromatic scale is all twelve notes arranged in ascending or descending order of pitch. You'll find below the 5 different positions/shapes of the C Chromatic Uke scale in Standard Tuning (gCEA), along with their ascending tab patterns. The chromatic scale or twelve-tone scale is a musical scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone above or below its adjacent pitches. It’s made up entirely of semitones (half steps) with each note being a semitone above or below the last note. The C chromatic scale has 12 notes, and uses every half-tone / semitone position. As you go down you play the same keys, except that some of the notes would be enharmonic equivalents, which means that they are the same keys with different names.