Take the quiz. Have you learned all the verbs? Apart from prepositions, even dative verbs and accusative verbs determine which case to use. The questions for the accusative are “whom” (“wen”) or “ what” (“was”). They are rarely used in conversational German. Apart from prepositions, even dative verbs and accusative verbs determine which case to use. All the best. Because word order is freer in German grammar, we use the accusative case to mark the direct object in a sentence. There are also very few verbs in German that use genitive case. But it is easy to distinguish which object is in accusative and which is in dative case: the person is always the dative and the other “thing” is the accusative. Fall/Wen-Fall in German), follows certain verbs and prepositions.It is used for the thing or person receiving the direct action of a verb. These verbs are usually found in formal writing (literature, in court or at the police station). the dative case is in the first position and the subject in the third: fehlen, gefallen, passen, passieren, schmecken, wehtun, es geht. You have to get 80% in order … So small that you should learn by heart these verbs that only have one object in dative case: fehlen, folgen, gefallen, gehören, glauben, passen, passieren, schaden, schmecken, vertrauen, wehtun, es geht. Subscribe to our newsletter or click here to follow us on Instagram to receive updates about new lessons and upcoming contests. In this example “Anna” is the direct object, “Paul” is the subject and “loves” is the action. In this post I’m going to explain the most usual verbs and how to distinguish between these two cases. Another easier way is to add a preposition. Very nice article, just what I wanted to find. Have you watched the video? The accusative complement is the direct object - the person or thing being acted upon. There are many German verbs that require accusative case (direct object) as well as dative case (indirect object). In the lists below, you’ll find common German dative verbs, accusative verbs as well as genitive verbs. The articles take the form: der/ein, die/eine, das/ein, die/-. The only exception to this rule is the verb sein. This group is very small. (Ich frage es ihn. The direct object of a sentence is always in the accusative case in German and will generally receive the action of the verb. Keep scrolling, keep learning! About half of these verbs are often used with inversion, i.e. der Nominativ: The subject is always in the nominative case. Just what I was looking for. An important point to remember is that the dative object precedes the accusative object. However, there are a few exceptions. It is best to simply learn the dative verbs first, because majority of the remaining German verbs are always accusative. You can learn more about cases in our lesson The 4 German Cases. I’ll go ahead and bookmark your site to come back later. That means when you use the verb, you have to include an accusative object or the sentence won't make sense or be grammatically correct. Click here to download your free PDF now! But it is easy to distinguish which object is in accusative and which is in dative case: the person is always the dative and the other “thing” is the accusative. Only when the accusative object is a pronoun, it is placed before the dative object. Pay attention – the pronoun can either be the subject or the accusative object. Whenever there are two objects in a sentence, the person is always dative and the thing is always accusative. There are also very few verbs in German … Important: the dative object must be before the accusative object. So, what about the second of the German grammatical cases? Wow. Many verbs require accusative case, however there is a set of verbs that always takes the dative case. I would “empfehlen” you to add more accusative verbs. Accusative Complements. But … how can I know? Two of these cases are the nominative and the accusative. Verbs with accusative AND dative case. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Saved as a favorite, I really like your site! In German, there are four different forms or categories (cases), called Fälle or Kasus. The answer is quite easy: in general, assume that all the verbs take the accusative case (except those mentioned below in #2, these take the dative)! Introduction. 15 Funny German Idioms You Should Know – Part 2, How to Use 2 Types of German Conjunctions in Sentences, How to Use 2 Types of German Reflexive Verbs in Sentences, 6 Must-Know German Modal Verbs in Present Tense, 70 Basic Dative Verbs and Accusative Verbs in German, Blumen – 15 Amazing Flashcards to Talk About Flowers, Free Ebook #3 – German Verbs with Prepositions, Easy Exercise on Question Words in German. There are only 2 exceptions: fragen, kosten. Accusative Case in German. While learning German, one of the most common difficulties every beginner faces is not knowing whether to use accusative case or dative case. As you know you can use the questions “who” (“wer”) or “what” (“was”) in the nominative case to find out what the subject of the sentence is. Here’s a list of frequently used German verbs that always take the dative case:-. Some verbs like fragen, kosten and lehren can take two accusative objects. The accusative case, also called the accusative object or direct object (4. We’ve also uploaded a list of verbs with prepositions for you. Written by Philipp. Some verbs take a “direct object” in the dative case instead of the normal accusative case. In the last sentences, you have to insert a pronoun. You probably have a few questions at the moment regarding the German accusative … The Different German Prepositions for Woher, Wo and Wohin, The Different Ways of Saying “to like” in German I, Du hast/brauchst/isst/kaufst/verkaufst/verschenkst. You can learn more about cases in our lesson The 4 German Cases. Here’s a list of genitive verbs in German:-. der Akkusativ: Most objects are in the accusative … This dative object is usually the only object in the sentence. Every weekend I'll send you some practical links and exercises to practice and improve your German. Such verbs are called as dative verbs in German. This was all about the accusative verbs and dative verbs in German. List of German Verbs That Use Accusative. Here is one of the most typical difficulties of learning German: knowing whether to use accusative or dative case with a verb. Only in case the accusative object is a pronoun, the accusative precedes the dative. These 2 verbs have a double accusative! If you learn just the dative and genitive verbs, no need to learn the accusative ones separately because except dative verbs and genitive verbs, all the other verbs are accusative. There are only a few verbs that use the genitive case. The majority of German verbs have an accusative complement (a.k.a. Except dative verbs and genitive verbs, all the other verbs are accusative. This means that majority of the verbs take accusative case. Es kostet mich nichts.). in Uncategorized. During conversations, a genitive verb can be easily replaced by another verb with the same meaning. There are also many verbs that accept both cases. Also, you learned in the previous section of this lesson that when there are 2 objects in a sentence, one is dative and the other is accusative. There are also many verbs that accept both cases. Verbs: geben, schicken/senden, bringen, kaufen, schenken, leihen, sagen, erklären, erzählen, zeigen. It always requires nominative case. accusative object). The only exception is the verb sein that always has nominative. Many verbs require accusative case, however there is a set of verbs that always takes the dative case. Since it can be very useful to learn these verbs (including example sentences), I want to provide you with a list of verbs that require you to use accusative after them. This group is the biggest of these two cases because the vast majority of verbs take the accusative. I’m not that much of a internet reader to be honest but your blogs are really nice, keep it up! In the first 5 sentences, you have to translate a sentence.